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Top 5 Travel Photography Tips

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I’ve just returned from my honeymoon in Europe which prompted me to make a list of my top tips to make successful travel images.

1. The telephoto

Don’t take a long telephoto lens with you, you will not end up using it. I’ve taken a 70-300 lens in the past and never found the need for it. My husband took a similar lens and didn’t pull it out more than once. Most subjects are in close proximity of where you are standing, and I find anything that’s taken from a really long distance doesn’t make a very good photo as it lacks the impact you get when you shoot at a closer range. On all my trips to Europe i have found the 24-70mm most useful.

2. Always take the shot

It happens so often. You see something that catches your eye, you hesitate, to take the photo, then say to yourself “I’ll just take it on the way back”. More often than not, you never walk past it on the way back, usually taking an alternate route to explore other areas. So always stop and take the shot there and then!

3. Look up

Foreign countries are filled with amazing architecture. Look up when you are walking down narrow streets or around the city – you will see the buildings from interesting angles, things hanging from balconies, maybe a flock of birds. Change it up and point your eye to the sky.

4. Show it your way

Look for something in your travels that other tourists aren’t capturing. It’s not always about shooting the famous monument. Think about what is going on in that place. When I visited the Mona Lisa this time around, there was a mass of tourists taking photos of the famous art work. I turned my camera to the people and got a shot of all the tourists with their cameras frantically pushing to get the best photo of the painting. This made for an interesting image with a story rather than the painting on the wall.

5. Look within the scene

When I travel I’m always noticing the intricate details and textures that help tell a story and give a sense of what the place is like. I notice fancy door handles, textures of walls, golden gates with beautiful emblems, the locals sitting with their dog, windows filled with geraniums (to me that says Europe).

If you can relate to any of these tips or have one of your own, feel free to leave a comment.